Adam Garfinkle At The American Interest: ‘Shock The Casbah’

Full piece here.

A very good analysis of the current Hamas-IDF skirmish in Gaza, and where it fits into other trends in the Middle East, with an interesting, modest proposal at the end (you’ll have to click through):

‘Today, we have to reverse the arrows: The ups and downs of the Palestinian impasse, like whether it is kinetic or not at any given time, have become instrumental with regard to the far more consequential future of politics in Egypt. Egypt is now less reliably useful to the United States as a mediator in Israeli-Palestinian affairs, but it has become far more important to the United States because its uncertain future will ramify across the entire, now destabilized Arab world, and also impinge significantly on the role of Iran and Turkey amid the Arabs.’

Related On This Site:  Adam Garfinkle At The American Interest: ‘What Did The Arab Spring Really Change?’Adam Garfinkle At The American Interest’s Via Media: “The Rise Of Independent Kurdistan?”..

Adam Garfinkle At The American Interest on Egypt: ‘Still More of the Same—and Something New’

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Categories: Current Events, Foreign Policy, Middle East, Politics, Public Debate, War

Author:chr1

An independent blogger seeking to discuss deeply while keeping an open mind. I'm mostly on the right, but living in Seattle I have to think about what that means on a daily basis. I like to read philosophy.

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