Goya’s Colossus

A dark vision.

Later in his life, Goya’s black paintings come from a man in a dark time, having lived through the peninsular wars, Spain’s continued decline, and illness and deafness.  He was still a man, though, who used his talent to the end.

There’s something transcendant about that figure, at first I thought it was just a man, standing honorably against our condition, ready to confront the unknown….. with fists clenched…

But then I saw the blank eyes, more like a man abstracted into a godlike force, into which human fear and ignorance can be projected.

Here is a link to a good Goya page.

Addition:  More here on the painting…and here on the dispute as to whether or not it’s his.

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3 Comments

uh mind telling us facts about colossus

There is some disagreement as to whether or not the painting is a Goya.

It is currently hanging in the Prado. It was painted between 1808 and 1812. It is approximately 45 3/4 by 41 1/4 inches.

It is an oil painting with dark colors. Beyond this, you might have to look in the art journals.

It could be one painting atop another, and it could be an allegory for the Napoleonic wars in Spain, or for Spain in general. Goya lived as a part of and witness to Spain’s long decline, and the arrogance, fear and foolish pride that resulted. Maybe he just got old, and where he once felt nationalistic pride, confidence in his talent, and some hope for Spain and humanity, he could only see darkness and ignorance.

Hopefully this has satisfied your factual desire…

Trackbacks and Pingbacks

Goya’s Fight With Cudgels « Chris NavinDecember 1, 2007 at 11:12 am

[…] See also: A previous Goya’s Colossus post. […]

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