From The WSJ: ‘Taliban Strike Heart of Afghan Capital’

Full piece here.

‘The Taliban launched a coordinated attack on the Afghan capital Monday, paralyzing the city for most of the day as militants set off explosions, took over buildings and attempted to disrupt the swearing-in of new cabinet ministers.’

The security of Kabul has been transitioned to Afghan forces, and many people in Kabul don’t feel very secure today.   My pessimism comes from the rank corruption of the current administration, including the current conditions that so easily lead to corruption:  poverty, geographical isolation, high illiteracy rates, tribal identities and loyalties, decades of war and economic incentive to grow and move opium, a porous border.  The Taliban perhaps can be hoped to have some incentives to disassociate from Al Qaeda, but in many ways, not much has changed, including the logic of why the U.S. is there and why our troops have such a difficult and sometimes confusing mission.

Related On This Site:  From Foreign Affairs: ‘Q & A With Stephen Biddle On Afghanistan’

From March 27th, 2009 At WhiteHouse.Gov: Remarks By The President On A New Strategy For Afghanistan And PakistanRepost-From Michael Yon: ‘The Battle For Kandahar’Dexter Filkins Book On Afghanistan And Iraq: “The Forever War”Monday Quotations-Henry Kissinger

Repost-’Dexter Filkins In The NY Times: The Long Road To Chaos In Pakistan’

Add to Technorati Favorites

2 thoughts on “From The WSJ: ‘Taliban Strike Heart of Afghan Capital’

  1. Most of those mujahedin leaders still active are part of the current government others such as Hikmatyar fight it. Karzai also relies heavily for advice from tribal and faction leaders from southern Afghanistan including Sher Mohammad Akhunzadeh the former governor of Helmand until 2005 as well as from well educated professionals such as his current Foreign Minister Zalmay Rasool and the former foreign minister now National Security Adviser Rangeen Spanta. Marjah is currently part of Nad Ali district and is eventually to become its own district according to Afghan observers. Part of the Afghan government and international mission is to empower localities to decide on development projects by forming local Community Development Councils CDCs that decide on local development projects and are key to the perceived success of the National Solidarity Program development program discussed later.

  2. Most of those mujahedin leaders still active are part of the current government others such as Hikmatyar fight it. Karzai also relies heavily for advice from tribal and faction leaders from southern Afghanistan including Sher Mohammad Akhunzadeh the former governor of Helmand until 2005 as well as from well educated professionals such as his current Foreign Minister Zalmay Rasool and the former foreign minister now National Security Adviser Rangeen Spanta.

Leave a Reply