How Deep Is Your Identity? Virginia Postrel At Bloomberg On Immigration

Virginia Postrel at Bloomberg: ‘Pro Immigration? Then Support All Who Came Here

Postrel:

‘As I wrote long ago, “Americans care, of course, about their economic interests. But they care first about their identities. … If voters feel personally attacked — because they are Latinos, or working women, or housewives, or evangelical Christians, or gays — they will bolt the party that serves their economic interests.” Or, given the opportunity, back a presidential candidate who promises to blow it up.’

I worry about the lifestylization of politics in America, which I see as eroding the distance between private and public, civility and coarseness, respect and its lack.  Such niceties do a lot more work than we realize.

Merely seeing individuals as members of voting blocs and identity groups misses crucial pieces of a larger puzzle, and also much of who and what we are.

As I see it, if the ideal uniting a group of people in common cause demands immediate action and/or allegiance to a group, expecting politics to become another means to an end, then we shouldn’t be surprised when people start drawing lines, making friends and enemies, and fighting over who belongs to which group under which ideal, and fighting over politics.

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That said, I agree with Postrel on the worn-out ideas and worn-out views from many traditional pulpits and parapets throughout the country.  Apparently, the higher you go into the lofty heights of opinion and influence, the thinner the air.

As a conservatarian on immigration (the people here first should be able to decide which kinds of rules will govern who come later through debate, politics, and legislation), I think we’ve gotten away from many simple, constitutional and civic basics from grade-school on, and it shows all throughout our lives.

People don’t simply open up borders, workplaces and economies, they open up their eyes, minds, and hearts over a longer period of time when united by common ideals, beliefs, principles and shared sacrifices (civic duties, Constitutional understanding, becoming an American and all the freedoms/responsibilities that come with being an American).

I believe these shared bonds will allow us to better ride the waves of rapid technological change, global economic and labor market pressures (immigration included), and the potential necessary and unnecessary conflicts that will arise going forward between competing interests (nations included).

We’ve got to sail the ship smart.  There’s work to be done.

Let me know if you disagree.

 

From The Nieman Journalism Lab: ‘An Oral History Of The Epic Collision Between Journalism And Digital Technology, From 1980 To The Present’

Full piece here.

Via Anthony De Rosa’s excellent tumblr site.

Check out Circa.

New technology comes raining down into your life all the time, so how are you managing it in order to get news and information?   Which other people are you looking to manage it for you?

How does this change with whom you might associate, which job you take, what’s true and important, and finally, how define your life in a Constitutional Republic with a representative democracy? (Ok, had to get that last part in there)

Great read.

Interesting times.

Jerry Pournelle saw some of this coming back in 1979!  Here he is predicting with surprising accuracy how the WWW and computing technology might revolutionize publishing.

Butterfly collars.  Cigarettes on air.  Those were the days:

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Related On This Site:  Technology changing how and why we congregate, and perhaps eroding the civic glue?: Adam Garfinkle At The American Interest-’Hey, You’re Truly Unlimited: Didn’t You Know?’

Charlie Martin At PJ Media: ‘Could Amazon and Jeff Bezos Make the Washington Post Profitable?’…‘Sorry, Jeff Bezos, the News Bundle Isn’t Coming Back

Michael Kinsley At The New Republic Via Althouse: ‘A Q & A With Jill Abramson’

From Slate: “Newsweek Has Fallen And Can’t Get Up”

A Few Thoughts On Blogging-Chris Anderson At Wired: ‘The Long Tail’

From The Atlantic: “Information May Want To Be Free. But Not Journalism”..Jack Shafer At Slate: ‘Nonprofit Journalism Comes At A Cost’From The Seattle Post-Intelligencer Via Sound Politics: Why Did The PI Die? 

From The Economist: ‘No News Isn’t Good News’

Walter Russell Mead At The American Interest: ‘Beyond Blue Part One: The Crisis of the American Dream’

Full piece here.

‘The frustration and bitterness that fills American politics these days reflects the failure of our current social, political and economic institutions and practices to deliver the results that Americans want and expect.’

The first of at least two parts, Mead will likely get you thinking (as he gets at the thought many Americans are likely sharing; that we’re living according to maps that don’t line up with the terrain like they used to).

Related On This Site:  Walter Russell Mead At The American Interest: ‘Rhode Island: Athens of America?’

He explains what he thinks that blue social model is in depth, and the people who make it up: Thoughts On Walter Russell Mead At The American Interest: “Why Blue Can’t Save The Inner Cities Part I”

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