From Nextbook: Philosopher Of Science Hilary Putnam On The Jewish Faith

Full post here.

It’s a Jewish publication, so I don’t expect a true questioning of faith as much as philosophy can obviously provide.  The word “God” is mentioned over twenty times in fourteen paragraphs.

“Hilary Putnam’s Jewish Philosophy as a Guide to Life is not disappointing. In a short series of equally short lectures on four important religious philosophers of the 20th century (Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas, and Ludwig Wittgenstein), Putnam outlines a rigorous and yet livable approach to Judaism.”

Ironically, I suspect the review’s author may be in part be motivated by the current identity politics of postmodernism.  Yet, of course, the questions (and Putnam too) run much deeper than that: 

Here are some leads if you’re interested:

  —Philosophy of science (and science itelf) have strongly agnostic philosophic traditions to draw upon, so my guess some of Putnam’s thinking has been influenced by Kant…here he is discussing his field: Bryan Magee’s Talking Philosophy On YouTube.

—Martha Nussbaum suggests re-examining the religious roots of the founder of Rhode Island, Roger Williams (Williams College)…perhaps to prevent excessive and ideological secularism?:  Martha Nussbaum Channels Roger Williams In The New Republic: The First Founder

—Daniel Dennet (Christianty paved the way for much of science, it’s time to keep moving on) debates Dinesh D’Souza (who ironically brings up both Nietzsche and Kant to support his religious arguments…to his detriment?): Dinesh D’Souza And Daniel Dennett at Tufts University: Nietzsche’s Prophesy.

—The Templeton Conversation asks the question:  Does Science Make Belief In God Obsolete?  Responses range from Steven Pinker to Christopher Hitchens and onward…

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