From io9: ‘Real-Life Locations That Would Make Badass Supervillain Lairs’

Full post here.

You know you’ve imagined all kinds of structures, buildings, and towers, and maybe what it’d be like to live in them.

Stephen Fry toured America and stopped in to visit some empty-nesters living in a old nuclear launch site:

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A structure in the desert…not even a city.  Land Art:  Update On LACMA, Michael Heizer And The ‘Levitated Mass’-Modern Art And The Public

In working towards a theme, check out Buzludzha, the abandoned communist monument in Bulgaria’s Balkan mountains, which still draws up to 50,000 Bulgarian Socialists for a yearly pilgrimage.  Human Planet’s Timothy Allen visited the structure in the snow and took some haunting photos.  You will think you’ve stepped into a Bond film and one of Blofeld’s modernist lairs, but with somewhat Eastern Orthodox tile frescos of Lenin and Marx gazing out at you, abandoned to time, the elements and to nature.

Related On This Site:  No thanks to living in planned communities upon someone else’s overall vision.: Roger Scruton In The City Journal: Cities For Living–Is Modernism Dead?Repost-Via Reason: ‘Salvador Allende’s Cybersocialist Command Center’From Grist.Org Via The New Republic Via The A & L Daily: ‘Getting Past “Ruin Porn” In Detroit’… some people don’t want you to have the economic freedom to live in the suburbs: From Foreign Policy: ‘Urban Legends, Why Suburbs, Not Cities, Are The Answer’

From io9 Via An Emailer: ‘Viral journalism And The Valley Of Ambiguity’

Full post here.

Maybe such a smart piece on virality will go viral:

‘Once you’ve worked as a writer and editor in the world of social media for a decade, the way I have, you start to notice patterns. For example, there are some stories that will never go viral, even if they are brilliant in every measurable way. That’s because they lie in the “valley of ambiguity,” which is sort of like the uncanny valley for viral journalism.’

Interesting theory.

Poor journalists.  Another theory as posted before:

‘The important thing to understand about journalists is that they are the lowest ranking intellectuals. That is to say: they are members of the intellectual class, but in the status hierarchy of intellectuals, journalists are at the bottom. That is why they have traditionally adopted the status cues of the working class: the drinking and the swearing, the anti-establishment values and the commitment to the non-professionalization of journalism.’

From The Nieman Lab:-An Oral History Of The Epic Collision Between Journalism & Digital Technology, From 1980 To The Present.

You could do like Matt Drudge, but the odds are stacked against you.